Guided Walks

 

During the season we offer free guided walks along the trails throughout the National Park and Slieve Carran Nature Reserve covering such topics as Burren flora, fauna and geology. Guided walks can also be arranged for interested groups. Please contact us for more information. All of our walks are entirely free but BOOKING IS REQUIRED as places are limited.

All non-National Parks and Wildlife Service staff wishing to provide a guided walk in the Burren National Park must APPLY FOR A PERMIT from the park Ranger.

 

Walking Trails

 

There are seven way-marked walking trails in the Burren National Park; five trails start from Gortlecka Crossroads (Mullaghmore Crossroads) and two trails start from Slieve Carran (Keelhilla Nature Reserve). The walks vary from a short thirty minute loop walk to a three hour walk over limestone mountains. Details of each of the walks are outlined below and a Walking Trails Map is available for download (JPEG 1.64MB) and in the National Park Information Point in Corofin. Each of the trails are signposted with colour-coded arrows. The trails traverse a limestone landscape which can be uneven and steep in places, so care must be taken. None of these trails are wheelchair accessible. For trail advice you can contact us at the Information Point by telephone, email, post or in person.

 

Burren National Park - Mullaghmore Crossroads

 

The Burren National Park is situated on the south-eastern side of the Burren, in north Co. Clare. To access the park, from Corofin, take the R476 to Kilnaboy. In Kilnaboy take the right turn (L1112) before the ruined church. Approximately 5 kilometres along this road you will reach a crossroads. There is a lay-by just before this cross roads on the right. Then on foot, turn right, along the ‘crag road’; Burren National Park lands are on your left. Please park in the lay-by not on the crag road to avoid damage to the vegetation. This is a public road so be careful of traffic.

 

There is no charge to park in the lay-by or to enter the Burren National Park.

 

Green Arrow Route (Nature Trail)

Grade: Moderate

Distance: 1.5km

Time: 40 mins

Climb: 20m

 

A 1.5km looped walk which passes through mature ash/hazel woodland within a doline, hay meadows and open limestone pavement. Beautiful views of Mullaghmore and Lough Gealáin. Some rough terrain with loose rock; suitable footwear is required. This walk is serviced by our free National Park bus service during the summer months*.

We have a free interactive app of the Burren National Park Nature Trail which you can use on your walk. This is available for the iPhone and iPad. To download The Burren app please visit the App Store or the iTunes store at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-burren/id705973027?mt=8

 

Orange Route (Knockaunroe Turlough)

Grade: Moderate

Distance: 1.3km

Time: 30 mins

Climb: 20m

 

A 1.3km looped walk which passes through mature ash/hazel woodland, hay meadow and past a turlough. Good trails throughout the walk; suitable for all ages and levels of fitness. This walk is serviced by our free National Park bus service during the summer months*.

 

Green Route (Mullaghmore Return)

Grade: Very Difficult Remote/Upland

Distance: 6.5km

Time: 2hrs 45mins

Climb: 140m

 

This walk consists of a return journey to the summit of Mullaghmore along the eastern side, and back down the same way to the Crag Road. This route is also serviced by the National Park’s free bus service during the summer months*.

 

Blue Route (Mullaghmore Loop)

Grade: Very Difficult Remote/Upland

Distance: 7.5km

Time: 2hrs 55mins

Climb: 140m

 

A 7.5km walk which loops around the summit of Mullaghmore mountain, passing through large open areas of limestone pavement and skirting the edge of Lough Gealáin. This walk is serviced by our free National Park bus service during the summer months*.

 

Red Route (Mullaghmore Traverse)

Grade: Very Difficult Remote/Upland

Distance: 6km

Time: 3hrs

Climb: 140m

 

A 6km non-looped walk which traverses Mullaghmore mountain, passing through large expanses of open limestone pavement, some grassland and skirting the edge of Lough Gealáin. This walk is serviced at either end by our free National Park bus service during the summer months*.

 

Slieve Carran/Keelhilla Nature Reserve

 

To get to Eagle's Rock/Slievecarran/Keelhilla Nature Reserve from Corofin take the R476 towards Kilinaboy. Drive through Kilinaboy and as far as Leamaneh Castle. Turn right here onto the R480. Then take another right onto L1014 (signposted Carran). Drive 5.3km to Carran and turn right when you see the church on the left. Slievecarran is 8.7km from here. Take the first left and keep driving until you see a parking area on the left. This is Slievecarran. Park here for Brown and Yellow Trails.

Alternatively you can take the R460 outside the Information Point. After 1.3km turn left to stay on R460, signed “Gort”. Drive for 12.1km. After passing Lough Bunny on the left turn left at crossroads onto L1010, signed “Ballyvaughan”. From the crossroads drive straight for 9.7km. Turn left at a crossroads, signed “Tea Rooms” and “Burren Perfumery”. Drive for 2.5km. When the road forks turn right and drive for 600m down this road. You will see a parking area on the right. This is Slievecarran. Park here for Brown and Yellow Trails.

 

Brown Route (Slieve Carran)

Grade: Moderate

Distance: 2.5km

Time: 1hr 30mins 

Climb: 30m

 

A 2.5km looped walk through open limestone pavement and passing through a small area of mature oak/ash/hazel woodland. Beautiful views of Eagle’s Rock cliff. This site includes a stone oratory, cave and holy well associated with St. Colman MacDuagh, who reputedly set up a hermitage here in the 7th century. This route is not serviced by the National Park bus.

 

Yellow Route (Slieve Carran)

Grade: Moderate

Distance: 2km

Time: 1hr

Climb: 20m

 

On this 2km looped walk you can explore the limestone pavement and orchid-rich grasslands for which the Burren is famous. This site is owned by the State and managed by a local farmer who practices the traditional farming method of winter grazing. This method is the key to conserving the unique flora found in the region. After grazing on this 'winterage' throughout the winter the stock are taken off in the spring and the short grass enables the flowers to emerge without having to compete for space, light and resources.

 

Trail Categories

Moderate Very Difficult
These trails have some climbs and an uneven surface where the going is rough underfoot with some obstacles such as protruding roots, rocks etc. The routes are appropriate for people with a moderate level of fitness and some walking experience.  Specific outdoor walking footwear and clothing is recommended. These routes are predominantly in remote upland areas. They will typically include steep slopes which can be very variable and rough underfoot. The routes are suitable for competent mountain walkers with a good level of fitness. Specific outdoor walking footwear and clothing required.

 

 

*The national park bus service is in operation from May to August during the 2014 season, running daily from 10.15 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

 

 

National Parks & Wildlife Service, 7 Ely Place, Dublin 2. Phone: +353 1 8882000 Fax: +353 1 8883272